Cyber Round Up: Shared Medical Data Without Consent; May Won’t Rule Out Cyber Response to N. Korea; The Fifth Domain Won’t be Sole Battleground

  • Sharing Medical Data Is Noble, but Not Without Patients’ Consent (WSJ):  A law passed late year was considered the biggest healthcare reform law since Obamacare.  Most of it was positive, a recent article says, but patient privacy rights took a big hit when the 21st Century Cures Act went into effect.  The law does not allow health care providers or patients to opt out of certain information sharing requirements.  According to the article, courts have upheld this provision under the third party doctrine as patients voluntarily give their information to their doctors. The article also addresses genetic information and another proposed bill that would have a similar effect.  The full piece can be read here.

  • Theresa May refuses to rule out military action or cyber attacks against North Korea after ‘outrageous’ missile launch (Mirror):  North Korea’s recent missile launch over Japan could have consequences that spill into the cyber world.  An article early today recapped the Prime Minister’s comments to reporters during her current trip to Japan.  While stressing on their desire to work with international partners, May specifically called out China for assistance in reigning in North Korea’s ‘outrageous’ attacks.  May did not rule out military action or high tech cyber operations.  The article noted that Defense Secretary Sir Michael Fallon said earlier this year that the UK would engage in offensive cyber operations when necessary.  The full article can be read here.

  • The Fifth Domain Won’t be Sole Battleground (The Cipher Brief):  The discussion of cyber as the fifth domain of warfare, and what warfare might look like in that domain, has a wide breadth of views.  Recent commentary highlights the extremes of this discussion and then poses a more moderate view point. James Van de Velde says that cyber needs to be viewed not as a separate and unique domain but as one that works in tandem with others.  The piece includes a discussion of whether cyber is truly different from everything else. Cyber, on its own, the article argues, is not enough to change the relationship between states. The full article can be read here.

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Authors

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Professor William Snyder

Professor William C. Snyderis a member of the faculty of the Institute for National Security and Counter-terrorism at Syracuse University after fifteen years with the United States Department of Justice.

Ryan D. White

Ryan D. WhiteRyan is currently a third year law student at Syracuse University College of Law, and is also pursuing a Master of Public Administration degree from Syracuse’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs. Ryan spent time with Homeland Security Investigations while pursuing his undergraduate degree at Wesleyan University, and spent his first summer of law school as clerk for the U.S. Attorney’s Office in the Western District of New York. He is a member of Syracuse Law Review, the Journal on Terrorism and Security Analysis, and participates in the Veteran’s Legal Clinic. Full biography

Shelby E. Mann

Ryan D. WhiteShelby is a second year law student at the Syracuse University College of Law. During her final year at the University of Missouri, she served as a full-time news producer for ABC 17 News. Shelby spent her first summer of law school at the Shelby County District Attorney General's Office in Memphis, Tenn., in the Public Corruption and Economic Crimes Unit. She is a member of Syracuse Law Review, the Journal on Terrorism and Security Analysis, and the senior editor for the Syrian Accountability Project. Full biography

Christopher w. FolkChristopher W. Folk

is a 2017 graduate of SU College of Law. A non-traditional student, Christopher returned to academia after spending nearly twenty years in the high tech industry. Christopher served in the Marine Corps, graduated from Cornell University with a B.S. In Applied Economics and Business Management, attended Northeastern University’s High-Tech MBA Program and received a M.S. In Computer Information Systems. Christopher previously worked in Software Engineering. Christopher is currently serving his second term as Town Justice for the Town of Waterloo. Christopher externed with a Cybersecurity firm in the Washington, D.C. area between his first and second year at SU College of Law. Full biography

Anna Maria Castillo

is 2016 graduate of Syracuse College of Law. She also holds a Master of Arts in International Relations from Syracuse University's Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs. She has interned at a London-based think-tank that specializes in transnational terrorism and global security and at the legal department of a defense contractor. She served as an executive editor in the Syracuse Law Review. Full biography

Jennifer A. CamilloJennifer A. Camillo

is a 2015 graduate of Syracuse College of Law and is a prosecutor. She has served as a law clerk in the United States Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of New York and the Cayuga County District Attorney’s Office and as an extern in the Oneida County District Attorney’s Office. She was a member of the Syracuse National Trial Team and was awarded the Tiffany Cup by the New York Bar Association for her trial advocacy achievements.

Tara J. PistoreseTara J. Pistorese

holds Juris Doctor and Masters of Public Administration degrees from Syracuse University's Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs and its College of Law. She wrote for this blog when a student. She is now a member of the U.S. Army Judge Advocate General's Corps.

Benjamin Zaiser

is both a scholar and a Federal Agent of the Federal Criminal Police Office of Germany. (Opinions expressed here are his own and not any part of official duty.) Full biography

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